Useful summary from Blend list-latest ed tech trends

I found this summary of the latest higher ed tech trends so useful I decided to repost it here:

Hey Clark (and everyone) Great video and there’s no arguing that these trends (scalable online programs mastered by for-profits, open educational resources for repurposing, and mobile technologies reshaping how/when we learn) but I’d argue there is an even more perfect storm brewing that’s shaking up our long held institutions (industry). There’s also: * MOOCs – Massive Online Open Courses (and soon full programs) — more than for-profits have mastered online courses, the MOOC movement (George Siemens, Sebastian Thurn formerly at Stanford now at Audacity, Coursera – Stanfords rush to compete with Audacity, Udemy, etc.) have really figured out the design of scaling courses to almost 100,000 students while maintaining high quality. It’s real. * Big Data, Learning Analytics, and Predictive Analytics — For the last decade, we all have ‘saved money’ at the grocery store using our club card which is basically the grocer paying us for our data so they can more effectively target market segments, manage inventory and distribution, mitigate risk, forecast, and develop new business strategies. This is starting to take off in education where we have systems that track student activity, profiles, etc. While there’s all sorts of ethical issues involved, there is enormous opportunity to empower faculty and institutions to be more responsive to student learning needs, enrollment trends, but this will no doubt reshape educational strategies (and empower those who have the data analytics figured out.) * New Credentialing and/or Digital Badges – one reason universities have not changed while every other knowledge-based industry has turned upside down is because we’ve long held a monopoly in our closed system on credentialing (i.e. degrees.) But a new system that opens not just educational resources (OER) but also credentials that employers can really use. Right now, most employers still don’t know what their new employees know or can do, because degrees are too inconsistent from institution to institution. So they’ve had to rely on name brand (ivy league hires only), their own assessments, or luck. Badges will break it down to demonstrable competencies which degrades the value of a degree. * Edupreneurs and Startups – In 2009, when we all were still crying in our beers about the economy, budget cuts (state schools), and shrinking enrollments (private schools), educational startups were reeling in record amounts of venture capital to unapologetically disrupt higher ed. In 2011, over $429-million venture capital sunk into new education startups. * Consumerization – we’ve all seen what the consumerization of IT has done — where new vendors and service providers go straight to the consumer, skipping over an organization’s IT department who long had control over what technology everyone in that organization used. Well, that’s now happening with teaching and learning — thanks to all these new startups. Universities have long had control over what students need to learn. But just like empowered consumers with affordable and powerful technology who ask “who needs our IT division'”, the same consumers will soon be empowered by the startups who provide affordable yet high quality learning and credentials asking “who needs the university.” * New Online Economies – We’re all familiar with the new online platforms that help people help each other (and make money from the connections and transactions) — craigslist, facebook, ebay, airbnb, yelp, etc. The same is starting to happen with education. The truth of the matter is there’s more than just faculty in the world who are experts (or expert enough) to help people learn. Also, digital goods (video lectures, online assessments, etc) unlike material goods, do not follow the standard supply and demand models. They can be replicated and shared in scale without depleting inventory or devaluation. So the whole economics of online learning is vastly different when developed in a networked platform — which is what 90% of the startups are. Online economies disrupting traditional models are analogous to quantumd physics did to newtonian physics. Perhaps the traditional models will still exist in a limited space, just like newtonian laws are not defunked, they’re just vastly limited. If any of this is of interest to you, there’s not a day that goes by where something’s not hitting the news. I’m curating a site devoted to these disruptive trends you’re welcome to follow: http://www.scoop.it/t/higher-education-disrupted-or-disruptor-your-choice Happy Monday. Susan On Mon, Apr 2, 2012 at 8:22 AM, Clark Shah-Nelson <clarkshahnelson@gmail.co= m> wrote: > > Hi all, > > In this short video, Sir John Daniels lays out his 3 trends to watch: shift from public HE to private for-profit, OER, and mobile learning. > I found the first section most interesting – the idea that there is higher quality in for-profit online learning due to division of labor and specialization. It seems like most of the press on for-profits in this realm has been on enrollment strategies and financial aid issues rather than the actual quality of the end product – courses and degrees. Do you agree that having individual faculty members handle most aspects of online courses results in low economy of scale and inconsistency in quality? Are there models for course and degree development in some of your institutions which address such concerns? > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DY5UktFLzlyg&feature=3Dyoutu.be > > > > Best, > Clark > > > Clark Shah-Nelson > Sr. Instructional Designer, CTLT > Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health > > > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. — Susan Gautsch =95 Pepperdine Bschool eLearning =95             310.568.5663       Some people fixated on making horses run faster, while others went and built a car. Higher Ed: Disrupted or Disruptor. Your Choice. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. –14dae934037345cf8c04bcb4fdc1 Content-Type: text/html; charset=windows-1252 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Hey Clark (and everyone)<br><br>Great video and there’s no arguing that= these trends (scalable online programs mastered by for-profits, open educa= tional resources for repurposing, and mobile technologies reshaping how/whe= n we learn) but I’d argue there is an even more perfect storm brewing t= hat’s shaking up our long held institutions (industry). There’s als= o:<br> <br>* MOOCs – Massive Online Open Courses (and soon full programs) — more = than for-profits have mastered online courses, the MOOC movement (George Si= emens,=A0Sebastian=A0Thurn=A0formerly at Stanford now at Audacity, Coursera= – Stanfords rush to compete with Audacity, Udemy, etc.) have really figure= d out the design of scaling courses to almost 100,000 students while mainta= ining high quality. It’s real.=A0<br> <br>* Big Data, Learning Analytics, and Predictive Analytics — For the las= t decade, we all have ‘saved money’ at the grocery store using our = club card which is basically the grocer paying us for our data so they can = more effectively target market segments, manage inventory and distribution,= mitigate risk, forecast, and develop new business strategies. This is star= ting to take off in education where we have systems that track student acti= vity, profiles, etc. While there’s all sorts of ethical issues involved= , there is enormous opportunity to empower faculty and institutions to be m= ore responsive to student learning needs, enrollment trends, but this will = no doubt reshape educational strategies (and empower those who have the dat= a analytics figured out.)=A0<br> <br>* New Credentialing and/or Digital Badges – one reason universities hav= e not changed while every other knowledge-based industry has turned upside = down is because we’ve long held a monopoly in our closed system on cred= entialing (i.e. degrees.) But a new system that opens not just educational = resources (OER) but also credentials that employers can really use. Right n= ow, most employers still don’t know what their new employees know or ca= n do, because degrees are too inconsistent from institution to institution.= So they’ve had to rely on name brand (ivy league hires only), their ow= n assessments, or luck. Badges will break it down to demonstrable competenc= ies which degrades the value of a degree.=A0<br> <br>* Edupreneurs and Startups – In 2009, when we all were still crying in = our beers about the economy, budget cuts (state schools), and shrinking enr= ollments (private schools), educational startups were reeling in record amo= unts of venture capital to unapologetically disrupt higher ed. In 2011, ove= r=A0$429-million venture capital sunk into new education startups.=A0<div> <div> <br>* Consumerization – we’ve all seen what the consumerization of IT h= as done — where new vendors and service providers go straight to the consu= mer, skipping over an organization’s IT department who long had control= over what technology everyone in that organization used. Well, that’s = now happening with teaching and learning — thanks to all these new startup= s. Universities have long had control over what students need to learn. But= just like empowered consumers with affordable and powerful technology who = ask &quot;who needs our IT division’&quot;, the same consumers will soo= n be empowered by the startups who provide affordable yet high quality lear= ning and credentials=A0asking &quot;who needs the university.&quot;=A0</div= > <div><br></div><div>* New Online Economies – We’re all familiar with th= e new online platforms that help people help each other (and make money fro= m the connections and transactions) — craigslist, facebook, ebay, airbnb, = yelp, etc. The same is starting to happen with education. The truth of the = matter is there’s more than just faculty in the world who are experts (= or expert enough) to help people learn. Also, digital goods (video lectures= , online assessments, etc) unlike material goods, do not follow the standar= d supply and demand models. They can be replicated and shared in scale with= out depleting inventory or devaluation. So the whole economics of online le= arning is vastly different when developed in a networked platform — which = is what 90% of the startups are. Online economies disrupting traditional mo= dels are analogous to quantumd physics did to newtonian physics. Perhaps th= e traditional models will still exist in a limited space, just like newtoni= an laws are not defunked, they’re just vastly limited.=A0</div> <div><br></div><div>If any of this is of interest to you, there’s not a= day that goes by where something’s not hitting the news. I’m curat= ing a site devoted to these disruptive trends you’re welcome to follow:= </div> <div><a href=3D”http://www.scoop.it/t/higher-education-disrupted-or-disrupt= or-your-choice”>http://www.scoop.it/t/higher-education-disrupted-or-disrupt= or-your-choice</a></div><div><br></div><div>Happy Monday.</div><div>Susan= =A0</div> <div><br></div><div><br></div><div>On Mon, Apr 2, 2012 at 8:22 AM, Clark Sh= ah-Nelson &lt;<a href=3D”mailto:clarkshahnelson@gmail.com” target=3D”_blank= “>clarkshahnelson@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>&gt;<br>&gt; Hi all,<br>&gt;<= br> &gt; In this short video, Sir John Daniels lays out his 3 trends to watch: = shift from public HE to private for-profit, OER, and mobile learning.<br> &gt; I found the first section most interesting – the idea that there is hi= gher quality in for-profit online learning due to division of labor and spe= cialization. =A0It seems like most of the press on for-profits in this real= m has been on enrollment strategies and financial aid issues rather than th= e actual quality of the end product – courses and degrees. Do you agree tha= t having individual faculty members handle most aspects of online courses r= esults in low economy of scale and inconsistency in quality? Are there mode= ls for course and degree development in some of your institutions which add= ress such concerns?<br> &gt;<br>&gt; <a href=3D”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DY5UktFLzlyg&amp;fe= ature=3Dyoutu.be” target=3D”_blank”>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DY5UktF= Lzlyg&amp;feature=3Dyoutu.be</a><br>&gt;<br>&gt;<br>&gt;<br>&gt; Best,<br>&= gt; Clark<br> &gt;<br>&gt;<br> &gt; Clark Shah-Nelson<br>&gt; Sr. Instructional Designer, CTLT<br>&gt; Joh= ns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health<br>&gt;<br>&gt;<br>&gt; ******= **** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constitue= nt Group discussion list can be found at <a href=3D”http://www.educause.edu= /groups/” target=3D”_blank”>http://www.educause.edu/groups/</a>.<br> <br><br><br><br>–<br>Susan Gautsch=A0 =95=A0=A0 Pepperdine Bschool eLearni= ng=A0=A0 =95=A0=A0 <a href=3D”tel:            310.568.5663      ” value=3D”+13105685663″ targ= et=3D”_blank”>310.568.5663</a> =A0 =A0=A0<br><br>Some people fixated on mak= ing horses run faster, while others went and built a car.<br> Higher Ed: Disrupted or Disruptor. Your Choice.<br> <br><br></div></div> ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. <p> –14dae934037345cf8c04bcb4fdc1–

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